UXasm

Some Stuff About User Experience, eCommerce, Social Media & etc.

Tag Archives: case study

Why Headlines Attract More User Attention Than Images

When websites show content, they’ll usually use a headline and image. Headline and image quality is important in getting the user’s attention. However, the headline will always get the most attention no matter what. Here’s why.

Look at this image. How relevant is it to you? What is the context behind the image? One could make guesses all day, but the fact is that nobody knows for sure.

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Green Button vs. Red Button

Should I put a red sign up button or a green sign up button on my page? Which one would get the most clicks? This is a classic problem that people building web products often face. People are constantly trying to figure out the one color that works best for all websites. We’ve been asked this question numerous times: Which color should I change my sign up button to?

The reality is that there is no universal color that works for all websites. There are some patterns that can help you get to the right answer though. The following is a great example of this in practice.

Ok, do us a favor and don’t read ahead. Look at the following two screenshots and answer this question: Which version of this homepage got more signups — red button or the green button?

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Usabilla Report: The UX of 18 Leading Travel Websites

Summer finally hit Amsterdam. In the vacation high season we decided to devote our very first quarterly user experience report to the travel sector. We lined up a total of 18 travel sites in three different categories (hotels, airlines, and comparison sites) and invited 800 participants to give feedback and perform simple tasks.

Report: UX in the Travel Sector (cover)Screenshot: Shatner made quite an impression on Priceline.com

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5 Things I Can’t Believe Websites Are Still Doing

The general consensus is that the Internet went mainstream sometime around 1996. That’s important because it means that for a decade and a half, the experts have been spouting off about how “in the future,” all businesses will be dependent on connectivity. Well here we are, we’ve arrived at the future, and even the corner dildo recycler has a website.

Via Sextoyrecyling.com

And many of them have no fucking clue how their audience thinks or acts. Otherwise, why are they still …

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The Science Of Usability Testing

From unskippable cutscenes to galvanic skin response, we investigate the world of videogame user research.

Difficulty spikes, unreliable checkpoints, context-sensitive buttons that might open a door, but might bounce a grenade into your lap instead: these things matter. “Every moment in a game, you’re bleeding players,” says John Hopson, Bungie’s user research lead. “Hopefully, you’re bleeding them as slowly as possible. The most powerful thing I ever did on Halowas make a graph showing how many players we lost each mission. We had these people: they bought the game, they wanted to play, and we failed them.”

Usability testing didn’t start with videogames. It started with product development of a more domestic stripe: with teapots, toasters and car dashboards. Although designers have always spared a thought for their audiences since the days of Jet Set Willy – it’s hard to make even the simplest videogame without thinking of what the player’s going to do or see from one second to the next – it’s only become a serious issue in the games industry relatively recently. Yet with no bespoke track at GDC, no standardised terminology, and no agreed best practices, usability may be gaining respectability, but it’s still one of the least understood aspects of design. That poses some interesting questions. How does the industry approach user research today, and why has something so fundamental waited so long to be taken seriously?

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Usabilla Report: The UX of 18 Leading Travel Websites

Summer finally hit Amsterdam. In the vacation high season we decided to devote our very first quarterly user experience report to the travel sector. We lined up a total of 18 travel sites in three different categories (hotels, airlines, and comparison sites) and invited 800 participants to give feedback and perform simple tasks.

Report: UX in the Travel Sector (cover)Screenshot: Shatner made quite an impression on Priceline.com

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Better Games Through Usability Evaluation and Testing

No one wants to play games that are either frustrating or difficult for the wrong reasons. The best way to make sure that unintended problems do not hinder enjoying the game is to take usability into account in game development. This article presents how this can be done and what kind of results to expect.

Usability is an integral part of software development and has been so for the past 20 years. For one reason or another, usability has not gained similar popularity in game development. This, however, is about to change. Ease of use and optimal user experience are already important in games and will become even more so in the future.

What is Usability?

Usability is about maximizing effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction. This definition originates from the traditional software industry, but it translates well to game development. In games, usability is about delivering a better and deeper experience with less unnecessary interruptions or challenges that have not been designed by the developers.

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The $300 Million Button

How Changing a Button Increased a Site’s Annual Revenues by $300 Million

It’s hard to imagine a form that could be simpler: two fields, two buttons, and one link. Yet, it turns out this form was preventing customers from purchasing products from a major e-commerce site, to the tune of $300,000,000 a year. What was even worse: the designers of the site had no clue there was even a problem.

The form was simple. The fields were Email Address and Password. The buttons were Login and Register. The link was Forgot Password. It was the login form for the site. It’s a form users encounter all the time. How could they have problems with it?

The problem wasn’t as much about the form’s layout as it was where the form lived. Users would encounter it after they filled their shopping cart with products they wanted to purchase and pressed the Checkout button. It came before they could actually enter the information to pay for the product.

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How to Lose Money With Bad Usability

I’m kind of a nut about usability. Jakob Nielsen is my hero and I live in a constant state of frustration at all the ways today’s systems (and the people who design them) pay little attention to the issue. While usability is an issue in all types of systems, many of the usability sins committed occur on the web.

Bad usability is also expensive. Many developers don’t always connect the dots between usability and revenue but if they did, they could save their organizations time and money, as well as avoid negative branding.

Here’s a recent example. I received an email a few days ago from The Hartford. It looked like this:

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User Experience and The Design of News at BBC World Service


Designing a setting for the torrent of content that passes daily through a news website is a challenge unlike any other. At the BBC World Service we’ve got a user experience and design team which designs and develops news sites for the web and mobile devices in 27 languages, catering for audiences across world. In this article I will share some of our experiences with you.

A sample of The BBC World Service news sites. Clockwise: BBC Russian, BBC Arabic, BBC Chinese and BBC Brasil

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